gaming

Play Longer, Spend More: Gamers Become Serious About Mobile

 

 

Gaming has been a crucial part of the mobile industry since the launch of the App Store in 2008. For seven years in a row, gaming apps have been used more than apps from any other category. Consequently, mobile gaming has truly shaped how we engage on our smartphones today. However, since 2015, gaming sessions have been on the decline. Does that indicate the end of the mobile gaming era?

Gaming: The Lingua Franca of Mobile

Some entertainers, like Michael Jackson, become worldwide stars. Others, like Psy of Gangnam Style, capture the world’s attention for 15 minutes. And others stop at the border, never attaining international fame. With games, the same is true. What makes one gaming title spread like wildfire beyond its country of origin to become an international juggernaut, while another is only a local hit? In today’s report, we investigate.

Gaming is the Global Pastime

The Gamification of Mobile Games

Apps are big business, and the biggest app business is games.  In 2012, Flurry estimates revenue earned from apps will approach $10 billion, with games taking over 80% of the pie.  The free-to-play business model (aka freemium), where consumers download and play the “core loop” of a game for free, but then pay for virtual goods and currency through micro-transactions, is the most prolific business model in the new era of digital distribution.

Social Networking Ends Games 40 Month Mobile Reign

The app revolution has changed the way software is distributed and used among consumers.  With a perfect storm of digital distribution, free content and powerful touch screen devices, the success of mobile apps has disrupted industries from telecommunications and games to music and news.  To date, no category of apps has been more successful than Games, directly disrupting the traditional gaming industry.

Apple and Google Capture U.S. Video Game Market Share in 2010

Last year, Flurry reported that iPhone and iPod touch game sales surged from 2008 to 2009.  From a standing start, and in just one year, iPhone games captured 5% of the mature U.S. video game market.  A year later, we revisit how the increasing popularity of iOS (iPhone, iPod touch and iPad) and Android games continue to increase their U.S. video game market share.

Mobile Social Gamers: The New Mass-Market Powerhouse

Hardcore Gamers are so 2007

As the growth of iOS and Android mobile devices continues to explode, there is a tectonic shift in the landscape of video gaming, a medium that continues to reach the most powerful spenders in the economy.  Not only are these emerging platforms attracting droves of existing gamers, but also spawning a new and highly engaged audience: the mass-market mobile casual gamer.  The era of marketing singularly to the 18 – 34 hardcore male gamer is officially over.