Apple

Samsung and Apple Jockey for Smartphone Leadership with Contrasting Approaches

Apple and Samsung together account for more than half of the world’s active smartphone install base, and are clearly the leaders of the OEM smartphone market. But if we take a closer look at how they each earn their market share, there are remarkable differences. This Flurry report takes a closer look at Apple versus Samsung market share, the number of products each company has in the market, top devices in the top 20 countries, and more. 

Will the iPhone 12 Convince Consumers to Replace Older iPhones?

When Apple launches its annual line-up of new iPhones each Fall, it creates a surge in device adoption that spans the holiday season. Since the 2017 launch of the completely reimagined iPhone X, improvements to subsequent phones have been incremental, offering gains mainly related to the chipset, camera and screen. Since then Apple has released the iPhone XS and XR variants, the iPhone 11 line up and the 2nd Generation iPhone SE. The iPhone 12, coupled with 5G support, seems poised for stronger than usual uptake.

Apple Increases Sales Velocity with Lower Priced iPhones

In 2018, Apple announced they would no longer publicly share the number of iPhone devices sold each quarter. Instead, they would focus on quarterly revenue as a way to include their growing services and subscription business. In the two years since this announcement, Apple has expanded its services business to seven offerings, including Apple Fitness+ and Apple One announced earlier this week. With this new revenue stream layered on top of the iPhone, Apple has been reducing the minimum starting price for the iPhone to expand their footprint and sell more services.

Apple Grows 2020 Market Share by Appealing to Lower Income Segment

For the last several years, Apple has pushed the limits of premium price points with its flagship iPhone line. Priced at nearly $1,500, fully-loaded iPhone XS and iPhone 11 Pro phones are now more expensive than some MacBook Pro laptops. This pricing strategy has helped Apple maintain its premium position in the market, grow revenue on a per unit basis, and attract more affluent consumers.

Apple and Samsung Jockey for Global Smartphone Dominance

Samsung and Apple dominate the smartphone industry globally. Combined, they control more than half the total market share on the planet. In most regions of the world, either Apple or Samsung is the top vendor. While Apple leads in its home market of North America, Samsung tends to lead elsewhere. In this report, Flurry looks at the global market share by active user base. While most market share analyses estimate device shipments or sales, Flurry directly measures what phones are in use today.

Gen Z and Millennials Prefer Apple Over Samsung

Gen Z and Millennials have grown up with mobile technology at their fingertips. Most don’t use landlines, or even cameras aside from the ones on their phones. Representing nearly half the population, and the bulk of consumer spending, major smartphone manufacturers are in a battle for their loyalty. In this report, we compare consumer demographics of Samsung and Apple smartphone users.

Apple’s iPhone SE 2 Building Momentum After Slow Start

Following the Fall 2019 launch of the iPhone 11 series—the most expensive and advanced iPhones to date—Apple launched the value-priced 2nd generation iPhone SE on April 24, 2020. The popular 1st generation iPhone SE was offered in 2016 as a less expensive alternative to the then flagship iPhone 6S and 6S Plus devices. And the launch of the second generation version follows the same playbook by offering strong value at a low price point. In this report, Flurry looks at how well the launch of the 2nd generation iPhone SE (aka iPhone SE 2) fared in the United States.

Tablet Usage Spikes During Covid-19

In 2010, Apple reinvigorated the tablet category with the launch of the iPad. And while the worldwide tablet user base has surpassed 1 billion devices, tablets still make up less than 10% of new device shipments compared to mobile devices. The tablet—an in-between device—is less portable than a smartphone and does not deliver the same computing power and multitasking capabilities of laptops.